Nursing School Information

Information about RN to BSN and MSN Degrees for Nurses

Archive for the ‘Nursing Career’ Category

National Nurses Week – Guest Post

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national nurses week May 2012Of course coming up in May a big week for nurses is happening. From May 6-12 nurses accross the United States will enjoy National Nurses Week. Given this moment there are a number of blogs that have been interested in having my writing to publish. So as the next few weeks goes by I will link in this and in other posts web sites in which I have had an article about national nurses week published.

 

 

 

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Written by samomulligan

April 20, 2012 at 1:24 pm

Travel Nurse Information – Guest Post

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nurses who travelVery good news today because we have gotten another guest post published today. Here is an exert:

“If you are thinking about joining ranks with the over 25, 000 travel nurses in the United States who travel to exciting destinations while earning a solid income, consider the fact that your professional reputation will follow you from place to place. Agencies that recommend and place nurses keep records and share information with potential employers. ”

If you are now interested in reading the entire article please go to:

http://travelnursingblogs.com/travel-nursing/professionalism-travel-nurse/

Written by samomulligan

January 4, 2012 at 2:42 pm

Posted in Nursing Career

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Is Nursing Management a Good Career for a Nurse

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traditional-nurseMore and more staff nurses are choosing to pursue a career in nurse management and administration.  Nurse Managers tend to enjoy a less frenetic schedule and are seen as motivating and responsible leaders and role models among their staff. This is a challenging and often stress-filled career, but for the right person, the professional and financial rewards are great.

Job Description

A nurse manager oversees and supervises health care operations in hospitals, nursing homes, community health care facilities and more.  This position requires the supervision of nursing staff and financial resources to ensure the delivery of safe, cost effective nursing care.  Nursing managers monitor the quality, clinical standards and professional development of their nursing staff.

Other duties associated with nurse management may include:

  • Recruitment of staff and human resource management
  • Preparation and management of budgets
  • Development and implementation of nursing policies and objectives as they pertain to staff, units and community groups
  • Controlling, evaluating and monitoring staff performance
  • Performing studies and research to assess the effectiveness of his/her unit’s nursing services as they relate to policies, objectives and financial resources
  • Developing relationships with community agencies and other health and education providers

Becoming a Nurse Manager

For individuals wanting to advance in the nursing profession, nurse management is a good option.  Most RNs start as staff nurses in a hospital, but may opt to move into a leadership position.  Solid experience and good performance evaluations can launch you into an administrative role that allows you to lead others and be part of a facility’s decision-making process. If you have excellent communication and negotiation skills, sound judgment and leadership abilities, nursing management is a career worth exploring.

In nurse management, there are several ways to advance.  You can go from an assistant unit manager or head nurse to a more senior-level roles like assistant director, director, vice-president or even chief of nursing.  As the job prospects grow for this field, hospitals are requiring advanced degrees or health services administration.

 

Education

Almost all nurse manager positions will require at least a BSN, and most will prefer that you have your MS in Nursing Administration.  Coursework and areas of study will cover the concepts and skills of management and administration, financial management, conflict resolution, effective communication and leadership skills and health policy development, and how to cultivate a leadership relationship with your staff.

Salary and Job Prospects

Salaries for nurse managers typically range from around $50,000 to more than $100,000, depending on your experience, training, and education.  Job prospects for nurse managers are very strong and the field is expected to grow significantly in the next five to ten years.

Nursing management is a excellent career path to consider if you are interested in doing something non-clinical and less intensely-paced, but still based at a hospital.

As with any other career, nursing management can be both challenging and rewarding.  Nursing management may not be for everyone, but it might be for you!  This specialized field requires unique skills and knowledge for in order to be successful and effective. If you have the right education and experience combined with excellent leadership skills and communication abilities, you may perfect for this career path.

Written by samomulligan

December 8, 2011 at 2:36 pm

Posted in Nursing Career

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Nursing Management a Good Career Move?

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Overview

More and more staff nurses are choosing to pursue a career in nurse management and administration.  Nurse Managers tend to enjoy a less frenetic schedule and are seen as motivating and responsible leaders and role models among their staff. This is a challenging and often stress-filled career, but for the right person, the professional and financial rewards are great.

Job Description

A nurse manager oversees and supervises health care operations in hospitals, nursing homes, community health care facilities and more.  This position requires the supervision of nursing staff and financial resources to ensure the delivery of safe, cost effective nursing care.  Nursing managers monitor the quality, clinical standards and professional development of their nursing staff.

Other duties associated with nurse management may include:

  • Recruitment of staff and human resource management
  • Preparation and management of budgets
  • Development and implementation of nursing policies and objectives as they pertain to staff, units and community groups
  • Controlling, evaluating and monitoring staff performance
  • Performing studies and research to assess the effectiveness of his/her unit’s nursing services as they relate to policies, objectives and financial resources
  • Developing relationships with community agencies and other health and education providers

Becoming a Nurse Manager

For individuals wanting to advance in the nursing profession, nurse management is a good option.  Most RNs start as staff nurses in a hospital, but may opt to move into a leadership position.  Solid experience and good performance evaluations can launch you into an administrative role that allows you to lead others and be part of a facility’s decision-making process. If you have excellent communication and negotiation skills, sound judgment and leadership abilities, nursing management is a career worth exploring.

In nurse management, there are several ways to advance.  You can go from an assistant unit manager or head nurse to a more senior-level roles like assistant director, director, vice-president or even chief of nursing.  As the job prospects grow for this field, hospitals are requiring advanced degrees or health services administration.

 

Education

Almost all nurse manager positions will require at least a BSN, and most will prefer that you have your MS in Nursing Administration.  Coursework and areas of study will cover the concepts and skills of management and administration, financial management, conflict resolution, effective communication and leadership skills and health policy development, and how to cultivate a leadership relationship with your staff.

Salary and Job Prospects

Salaries for nurse managers typically range from around $50,000 to more than $100,000, depending on your experience, training, and education.  Job prospects for nurse managers are very strong and the field is expected to grow significantly in the next five to ten years.

Nursing management is a excellent career path to consider if you are interested in doing something non-clinical and less intensely-paced, but still based at a hospital.

Conclusion

As with any other career, nursing management can be both challenging and rewarding.  Nursing management may not be for everyone, but it might be for you!  This specialized field requires unique skills and knowledge for in order to be successful and effective. If you have the right education and experience combined with excellent leadership skills and communication abilities, you may perfect for this career path.

Written by samomulligan

October 26, 2011 at 7:05 pm

Murphy’s Law – For Nurses

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Saw this posted on Murphy Laws Site:

Murphy’s nurses laws

  • When you need the money, your shift is cancelled; when you have a weekend planned, you have to do overtime.
  • Realizing the patient you’ve just injected has a serious infection causes you to stab yourself with the used needle.
  • A 500 pound patient needs all care, while your 80 pound patient needs a finger dressing … and your colleague has a “bad back.”
  • It’s you’re first night shift for three years. And it’s a full moon.
  • You’re doing the “Only 27 more minutes of the shift from hell happy-dance”, only to turn around to see your supervisor standing there.
  • In a critical situation, the most highly qualified clinician will offer the most advice and the least support.
  • The absurdity of the suggestion is directly proportional to the distance from the bedside.
  • As soon as you finish a thirty minute dressing the doctor will come in, and take a look at the wound.
  • The disoriented patient always comes from a Nursing Home whose beautiful paperwork has no phone number on it.
  • Your nose will itch the very moment your gloved hands get contaminated with bodily fluids.
  • The patient who has been dying all night finally meets his maker 12.5 minutes before shift change.
  • You walk out of a patient’s room after you’ve asked them if they need anything: they will put the call bell on as you are about three quarters the way down the hall.
  • The patient furthest away from the nurses’ station rings the call bell more often than the patient nearest to the nurses’ station.
  • The doctor with the worst handwriting and most original use of the English Language will be responsible for your most critical patient.
  • You always remember “just one more thing” you need after you’ve gowned, gloved, and masked and gone into that isolation room.
  • The correct depth of compression in adult CPR is a bit less than the depth you just reached when you broke those ribs.
  • When you cancel extra staff because it’s so quiet, you are guaranteed a rash of admissions.
  • If you wear a new white uniform, expect to be thrown up on.
    Corollary: Residents always poop on your brand new shoes.
  • When management smiles at you, be very, very afraid …
  • Staffing will gladly send you three aides–but you have to float two of your RNs.
  • As soon as you discontinue the IV line, more fluids will be ordered.
  • Mandatory meetings are always scheduled after you’ve had the night from hell and just want to go home to bed.
  • You always forget what it was you wanted after you get to the supply room. You always remember when you get back to the other end …
  • Doctors only ask your name when the patient isn’t doing well.
  • Success occurs when no one is looking, failure occurs when the boss is watching.
  • As soon as you’ve ordered the pizzas, 25 patients show up at the ER registration desk along with three ambulances all with cardiac arrests!
  • For every action, there is an equal and opposite criticism.
  • Ten seconds after you have finished giving a complete bed bath and changing the bed, the patient has a giant code brown.
  • If a patient needs four pills, the packet will contain three.
  • Your buddies who were reading the paper at the nurses’ desk a minute ago always disappear when you need help …
  • Expect to get your pay raise the same day the hospital raises the parking rates (and other charges)
  • The better job you do, the more work you can expect to be handed …
  • The amount of clean linen available is inversely proportional to your immediate needs.
  • The more confused and impulsive a patient is, the less chance there is for a family member or friend to sit with the patient.
  • The perfect nurse for the job will apply the day after that post is filled by some semi qualified idiot.
  • If only one solution can be found for a problem, then it is usually a stupid solution.
  • When the nurse on the preceding shift has surrounded the patient with absorbent pads, the code brown will hit every sheet and miss every pad.
  • Rest assured that when you are in a hurry, the nurse’s notes have not been written.
  • When you are starting an IV on an uncooperative patient, or dealing with a huge code brown, there is a phone call for you and it’s that crabby physician that you have been paging all morning.
  • Fire drills always occur on your day from hell
  • The first person in line when the clinic opens will not require urgent care. The sickest person will arrive 5 minutes before closing: “I thought I’d feel better”

Written by samomulligan

August 3, 2011 at 2:12 pm

Posted in Nursing Career

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National School Nurse Day

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Wednesday, May 11 – National School Nurse Day!

In a message posted on The National Association of School Nurses, NASN, its President describes the day as “a time to celebrate the nursing profession and the specialty of school nursing”.

If your child attends a school that engages the services of a nurse make sure say a thank you to them today. Just like teachers these profesionals work hard at helping to raise our children and from time to time an extra thank you should be give.


Written by samomulligan

May 11, 2011 at 1:55 pm

Posted in Nursing Career

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Nurses Week – May 6 Through May 12th

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National Nurses Week is celebrated annually from May 6, also known as National Nurses Day, through May 12, the birthday of Florence Nightingale, the founder of modern nursing.

Celebrating NursesA Brief History of National Nurses Week

1953 Dorothy Sutherland of the U.S. Department of Health, Education, and Welfare sent a proposal to President Eisenhower to proclaim a “Nurse Day” in October of the following year. The proclamation was never made.

1954 National Nurse Week was observed from October 11 – 16. The year of the observance marked the 100th anniversary of Florence Nightingale’s mission to Crimea. Representative Frances P. Bolton sponsored the bill for a nurse week. Apparently, a bill for a National Nurse Week was introduced in the 1955 Congress, but no action was taken. Congress discontinued its practice of joint resolutions for national weeks of various kinds.

1972 Again a resolution was presented by the House of Representatives for the President to proclaim “National Registered Nurse Day.” It did not occur.

1974 In January of that year, the International Council of Nurses (ICN) proclaimed that May 12 would be “International Nurse Day.” (May 12 is the birthday of Florence Nightingale.) Since 1965, the ICN has celebrated “International Nurse Day.”

1974 In February of that year, a week was designated by the White House as National Nurse Week, and President Nixon issued a proclamation.

1978 New Jersey Governor Brendon Byrne declared May 6 as “Nurses Day.” Edward Scanlan, of Red Bank, N.J., took up the cause to perpetuate the recognition of nurses in his state. Mr. Scanlan had this date listed in Chase’s Calendar of Annual Events. He promoted the celebration on his own.

1981 ANA, along with various nursing organizations, rallied to support a resolution initiated by nurses in New Mexico, through their Congressman, Manuel Lujan, to have May 6, 1982, established as “National Recognition Day for Nurses.”

1982 In February, the ANA Board of Directors formally acknowledged May 6, 1982 as “National Nurses Day.” The action affirmed a joint resolution of the United States Congress designating May 6 as “National Recognition Day for Nurses.”

1982 President Ronald Reagan signed a proclamation on March 25, proclaiming “National Recognition Day for Nurses” to be May 6, 1982.

1990 The ANA Board of Directors expanded the recognition of nurses to a week-long celebration, declaring May 6 – 12, 1991, as National Nurses Week.

1993 The ANA Board of Directors designated May 6 – 12 as permanent dates to observe National Nurses Week in 1994 and in all subsequent years.

1996 The ANA initiated “National RN Recognition Day” on May 6, 1996, to honor the nation’s indispensable registered nurses for their tireless commitment 365 days a year. The ANA encourages its state and territorial nurses associations and other organizations to acknowledge May 6, 1996 as “National RN Recognition Day.”

1997 The ANA Board of Directors, at the request of the National Student Nurses Association, designated May 8 as National Student Nurses Day.

While teachers, police, and other people who work each day to help make the lives of those around them better it is always a nice move to set aside a few minutes to provide some recognition. Let us hope that employers of nurses throughout the country take the time to offer a gift or at least a kind word for their employees.

Written by samomulligan

April 28, 2011 at 5:18 pm

Posted in Nursing Career

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